specific gas motor recommendations

I'm a new Flying Scot owner. Many years ago I had a Lightning and found that a small motor allowed me to go sailing more as I was commonly "on call" and a small motor assured me that I could get back to the dock even if the wind died. I want to add a small motor to my Flying Scot for the convenience. It appears from the other forums that a 2HP is adequate. Is the true? Also I've seen Honda 2HP and Suzuki 2.5HP specifically mentioned. Any other specific recommendations for 4 cycle engines? Is the standard shaft length correct or is a long shaft needed? Thanks

Comments

Rog, I bought the Honda 2HP 4stroke as I keep my Scot in a na

Rog, I bought the Honda 2HP 4stroke as I keep my Scot in a narrow canal system that would require much tacking to enter and return. I didn't realize how nimble the Scot was and soon found I was leaving the motor behind. It is the standard shaft length and was quite adequate.Never had to rev it to full throttle to get 4-5 kts. I'd sell it to you if you can figure out the shipping. It has only about 10 hours on it (just broken in)and has had its first oil change. Let me know. Alan

I have been pleased with my 4 stroke Yamaha 2.

I have been pleased with my 4 stroke Yamaha 2.5 Hp. Great when the wind dies. Monroe Lake Norman, NC

I have a nearly 20 year old 2 HP evinrude motor that weighs 28

I have a nearly 20 year old 2 HP evinrude motor that weighs 28 lb. In selecting a motor the motor weight is a priority consideration as one has to lean over the aft deck to mount the motor. The motor has spent most of the time in my basement and was used only occasionally, and even then only as "insurance". The motor is fine for take home power on a windless day. However it will not readily push the scot against strong head wind and waves in case you want to use it for take home power when there is too much wind to sail comfortably. I keep the motor under the foredeck when not in use, and at 28 lb I find that it is relatively easy to manage carrying it.The motor selection is a trade off on convenience weight vs.power for getting through wind and waves.

We have been sailing just one year with our FS, and use the Hond

We have been sailing just one year with our FS, and use the Honda 2HP, long shaft motor. Our experience with this motor has been great, we find it to have plenty of power, even in strong winds, without having to use full throttle. We camp and sail at the same lake, and found the motor greatly extends the use of the boat. When the wind dies, we can cruise the lake in the early morning or late evening and enjoy the wildlife or go fishing. I know it is not the cool thing to use, but the little Honda has made our first year sailing with the FS a very pleasurable experience! Check out my other post under the Owning, Rigging section-Locking new motor mount, for my modified Motor Mount. Also use the search function, for the "Palm Device," that will improve the main sheet operation, with a motor, during a jibe.

We kept our 2HP longshaft motor from a previous 18.

We kept our 2HP longshaft motor from a previous 18.5 ft daysailor and use it on our FS....sometimes. It pushes the Scot great easily and works reliably and is not too heavy. We have anchor chain (with padlock) run thru the handle and thru the transome port ring (with the philips screw heads ground out so a screwdriver will not work...of course, a thief can unscrew from inside but more work). My two cents.

Hi Rog, Welcome to the Scot family! I am a new owner also a

Hi Rog, Welcome to the Scot family! I am a new owner also and was faced with the same decision as you. The motor decision was between the Honda and Suzuki. Both way 30 pounds which is much less than the competition. An older used two stroke would be a consideration for you if you did not mind the oil and gas mixture. Another possibility is the battery powered Torqeedo. http://www.torqeedo.com/us/hn/home.html I ended up with the Suzuki as it is water cooled which makes it quieter than the Honda. It also was quite a bit less money. The Toqeedo was very attractive, light and quiet but it was much more money and had limited run time. I like the Suzuki very much and do not regret the purchase. Peter Dubé Vero Beach, FL

Thank you all for the responses on this forum and via email.

Thank you all for the responses on this forum and via email. It appears that 2HP is adequate for getting back to the dock with no or minimal wind. A little larger engine would be nice if using against a strong current, waves, or when the wind is too strong to safely sail and one wants/needs to motor somewhere. (Like back home from a cruising trip I imagine.) I believe the Flying Scot motor mount is rated up to a 3HP engine, and I know 4HP engines are used by some. So while possible to use a slightly larger engine, weight becomes more of as issue due to having to handle the engine over a large rear deck. In fact weight seems to be the dominant issue for most. For me,as an anticipated "day cruiser", I suspect the smaller engines will be fine. The Honda 2HP and the Suzuki 2.5Hp are frequently mentioned and are the lightest 4 stroke engines at under 30#. The 37# - 41# group adds additional excellent motors that people liked also. Both the Honda and Suzuki are very low emissions engines which I like. The Honda is air cooled (an apparent advantage in salt water), but is noisier than the water cooled Suzuki. While list prices are different, I found similar discounted prices from the dealers I talked to. Some liked the centrifugal clutch design of the Honda, while others disliked it and preferred the neutral - forward gearing of the Suzuki. Both Honda and Suzuki engines are liked by their Flying Scot owners. Some have and like the long shaft while others feel the standard shaft is fine. By measurement the standard shaft should be fine, but I'll check this out further. This is a summary of what I've learned on this Flying Scot forum, contacting dealers, other sailing forums, and various reviews found on the internet. Any agreements - disagreements, etc.? Again thanks for the help. It is truly nice to have a forum to get views from far more experienced Flying Scot sailors than I am. I'm looking forward to becoming one of you this coming summer! Rog Klettke

I just remembered something concerning shaft length.

I just remembered something concerning shaft length. If someone was going to motor into very choppy and good height waves, then the stern comes up out of the water as the bow noses in the troughs...and a short shaft propeller would also come out of the water. When this happened to me some though was in some cuts around Charleston, SC sea state, where my 8HP long shaft Mariner was a god send on our '84 25 ft MacGregor. So I would figure in where I boat and what weather/water conditions.

I have a question for Suzuki 2.

I have a question for Suzuki 2.5HP owners. I bought one of these recently to replace a Merc 2.5HP two-stroke I owned. The Suzuki is a much better engine: quieter, cleaner, no heavier, and *far* more reliable. However, I've noticed one apparent drawback: the tilt mechanism. Attached to the FS motor mount bracket, I can't tilt the motor far enough to engage the tilt mechanism: it hits the transom before it can lock. I didn't have this issue with the Merc. I've dealt with this so far by simply bungeeing the motor up. I'm thinking to order the relevant part from Suzuki Marine and alter it so that it engages at a lower angle. Does anyone have a better solution? -Richard Larson -5573

I was thinking about the 2 hp Honda because it is light and is a

I was thinking about the 2 hp Honda because it is light and is air cooled. I will be using it in salt water. I was curious about the best shaft length. You would want it long enough so that the prop would not cavitate as it came high up in the water, however if the shaft is too long, I was afraid that it might drag in the water while under sail. on starboard tack (when the motor would be on the low side of the boar). Anyone have any first hand observations?

Unfortunately, when I was using my "short" shaft Honda, some por

Unfortunately, when I was using my "short" shaft Honda, some portion of the prop was dragging even when the boat was flat. I've since realized that the Scot doesn't need a motor.

Last I heard Flying Scot suggests short shaft.

Last I heard Flying Scot suggests short shaft. This conforms with Honda's instructions about desirable depth of the propeller.

[quote][i]Originally posted by rlarson[/i] [br]I have a questio

[quote][i]Originally posted by rlarson[/i] [br]I have a question for Suzuki 2.5HP owners. I bought one of these recently to replace a Merc 2.5HP two-stroke I owned. The Suzuki is a much better engine: quieter, cleaner, no heavier, and *far* more reliable. However, I've noticed one apparent drawback: the tilt mechanism. Attached to the FS motor mount bracket, I can't tilt the motor far enough to engage the tilt mechanism: it hits the transom before it can lock. I didn't have this issue with the Merc. I've dealt with this so far by simply bungeeing the motor up. I'm thinking to order the relevant part from Suzuki Marine and alter it so that it engages at a lower angle. Does anyone have a better solution? -Richard Larson Yes, I did have the same problem. I initially installed a piece of wood about and inch thick on top of the motor mount. That works. But, then I simply remounted the wood motor mount block an inch higher on the bracket. Easy.

I posted a question earlier about the Suzuki 2.

I posted a question earlier about the Suzuki 2.5 engine and its tilt mechanism. Following a suggestion by Rog Klettke, I simply replaced the piece of wood in the mounting bracket that Flying Scot Inc provided with one that was 1.5 inches taller. That worked perfectly. The elevation is not just sufficient to allow the tilt mechanism to engage. Furthermore, the position of the propellor in the water looks exactly right. The manufacturer recommends that the cavitation plate be around 1.5-2" below the surface of the water and that is where it is with the taller motor mount. This, by the way, suggests that one does NOT want to buy a long shaft engine for one of these small, low horsepower outboards. A long shaft would place the exhaust outlet too low in the water and the engine will be fighting the increased water pressure. -Richard Larson 5573

I posted a question earlier about the Suzuki 2.

I posted a question earlier about the Suzuki 2.5 engine and its tilt mechanism. Following a suggestion by Rog Klettke, I simply replaced the piece of wood in the mounting bracket that Flying Scot Inc provided with one that was 1.5 inches taller. That worked perfectly. The elevation is now just sufficient to allow the tilt mechanism to engage. Furthermore, the position of the propellor in the water looks exactly right. The manufacturer recommends that the cavitation plate be around 1.5-2" below the surface of the water and that is where it is with the taller motor mount. This, by the way, suggests that one does NOT want to buy a long shaft engine for one of these small, low horsepower outboards. A long shaft would place the exhaust outlet too low in the water and the engine will be fighting the increased water pressure. -Richard Larson 5573 [/quote]

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Motor questions

Hello,

I'm new to this forum and I'm in the process of buying a Flying Scot.  I have some sailing experience (ASA 101 plus a bunch of charters), but this is my first owned boat.  Reading this site helped me decide on buying a Flying Scot and has been very useful overall.

I have some questions on a motor.  I'm going to (at least initially) be sailing in a tidal river.  I'm getting a slip to reduce the time of getting ready to sail.  I expect my windows of time for sailing will only be a few hours, so I want to spend as much of that sailing as I can.

I'm thinking of getting a Tohatsu 4 stroke, 4 hp, regular shaft (15") outboard with a 0.3 gallon integrated fuel tank.  Tohatsu because it gets good reviews for reliability and cost.  4 hp because I expect I'll make mistakes on the tide tabels and need to motor home against the current.   While the 4hp is heavier (58 lbs) than the smaller engines, because the boat will be in a slip, I think that takes care of the issue of hauling it on and off more frequently.  I also want to get a new engine because it is my first boat, and I don't have experience fixing engines, so hopefully it will give me more reliability.

Two questions on the Tohatsu. 

First, I've ready that some people have had trouble getting their outboard to fully tilt and have modified the motor bracket.  I'd like to avoid getting involved with modifications and was wondering if anyone has had success with the Tohatsu out-of-the-box?

Second, I don't have any sense on how far a 0.3 gallon tank will take me.  Do people just carry some extra fuel in an external tank and refill the engine if needed?  It seems that for FS's, people aren't connecting the outboard to an external tank (and I'm not interested in doing that either).  Any rules of thumb on how far 0.3 gallon of fuel will take a FS, against some current and maybe some chop?

Generally, is there a different motor I should be looking at?  I started with Honda's, but they don't seem to make a 4hp, and are more expensive.  It goes from 2hp to 5hp, and for the reasons above, I want more than 2hp.  FS Inc says the max is 4 hp.  Nissan and Mercury are the same as Tohatsu at this size.  Suzuki and Yamaha's closest dealer was much further away.

Many thanks in advance for any advice.

 

Not keen on Nissan/Tohatsu

I realize that it has been almost a year since your post, jcmfs, but I was just looking through this thread b/c I am fed up with my Nissan 3.5 HP, which is the same as/made by Tohatsu.

The main issue is the design of the stopcock, which includes a "hidden" fuel filter.  Only after browsing forums for a while in desperation did I find this out.  Had to replace the while stopcock assembly, but a second result of the poor design is that I can not really use the stopcock now without taking off the motor cover.  Very frustrating, and somewhat dangerous.  Other issues with this motor include weight and poor idling.  It is water cooled, but since I have to run it with the cover off, I'm not sure what good that really does me!

Anyway, I am looking at the Honda and the Suzuki as possible replacements. 

Good luck,

Rick, FS 473