Hull Softness: Safety and Repair Q's: Help!

Hi, Any recommendations / advice will be most appreciated. I'm a second owner of a '77 boat and considering hull soft core problem. The crutch hole was repaired, just not soon enough. I feel flex in the top fiberglass layer; it feels like delamination from the balsa and bottom of the hull. The first area is maybe 8 inches by 15 on left side of the trunk beginning at the boom crutch; the second area is smaller to the right side of the trunk from the crutch block. Some of my questions include: Timing - do I have to address this ASAP to prevent further deterioration or is the hull watertight after the repair of the crutch hole. Safety - is there danger of a foot penetrating the soft areas. Time - for a handy sailor with a day job, is this a 40 man-hour job, 120?...is there a estimable range? Options - I'm told not to invest significant money in this age boat. (It is otherwise in great condition and well equipped.) I'm told to dry sail it or sell it as is. Dry sail is not a great option for my sailing venues. If moored, will it gradually absorb more water? Would a lightweight wooden flooring platform address the safety issue if the hull is watertight? Anyone in Eastern MA know of a reasonable repair location and cost. Is a repair by a marina/shop a possibility this season or is next winter likely? Thank you for reading a long post and helping an enthusiast evaluate his problem. Jon, Brewster YC (Cape Cod).

Comments

On the "how to" page of the Flying Scot website there are instru

On the "how to" page of the Flying Scot website there are instructions for doing balsa repairs. The factory lists a charge of $72/square foot for them to do the repair. I have recored about 10 - 12 sq. ft. of the floor of my boat. It is not hard to do but it is a messy job. Anyone with some fiberglassing experience could do a 1 sq. ft area in 2-3 hours.

I have just recored my 30+ year old hull from the aft edge of t

I have just recored my 30+ year old hull from the aft edge of the cockpit floor midway up the trunk. its not that hard, just tedious. mine started just like yours, at the boom crutch hole. they are now gone with a teak piece glassed at both places with dowel that will fit into the crutch end to keep in place. I actually had three holes through the hull the damage so extensive. A soft floor is a problem. Take your time, fix it yourself (if you pay someone else they won't do it any better than you will yourself, and when you're done you will know exactly what you have under your feet. "Demon too" will be an able vessel long after i'm dead, so I have no worry about the hull at all.

Has anyone ever recored the entire floor of thier boat before us

Has anyone ever recored the entire floor of thier boat before using the instructions on flyingscot.com? (the raised portion of the floor) If so, How much resin should I get, and roughly how much time and money did the project end up costing you? Thanks! Ryan Flynn FS 3020 Tampa, FL

I am in the process of recoring the entire floor on FS #38 and c

I am in the process of recoring the entire floor on FS #38 and can tell you it is a big task. The hull must first carefully be suspended and supported in order to keep the original shape. (I have templates taken off of my newer boat to compare to.) A circular saw set at 1/4 inch and a dremel with a diamond wheel was used to cut the floor skin. Balsa scraped out, (it looked like mulch.) A 4 inch grinder with 36 grit flex disc was used to grind off the remaining tabbing. That is where I am currently, and I can't say how much money I will have in balsa and resin, I hope to be around $750 but I could be off. If it where not for the super low hull # I would probably pass on such a project. Also one must consider where to do a job like this, recoring the entire floor isn't something you do in one side of your garage, it is messy. Andy Hayward FS #38 FS#4318

Thanks Andy! There are two areas that were worrying me, the p

Thanks Andy! There are two areas that were worrying me, the port side of the bow portion of the floor, and a 1 1/2' X 1' section just aft and stardboard of the centerboard trunk. I took a core sample of each area. It appears I actually may of lucked out. The core sample for the bow came out solid. I have some delamination that I am going to address by drilling a second hole from where I drilled my core sample and use a icing bag to pump some epoxy till it starts to come out the second hole. Then place some weights on the area to press the layers together. The core sample of the second area towards the stern came back wet, but not rotten. I'm going to remove romove the glass covering the section and, assuming that I don't run into any unexpected problems, (yeah, I just put a hex on this project) dry out the area and rebuild the top layers as graciously outlined on flyingscot.com. Harry, if you read this, thank you for your detailed instructions. They've been invaulable on numerous projects. Ryan Flynn FS 3020 Tampa, FL

Ryan, Good to hear you have some small areas to repair.

Ryan, Good to hear you have some small areas to repair. Come join us At DIYC for our monthly fleet races! Send me your E-mail address and I will get you on the mailing list. I'm in Brandon. Andy Hayward FS #38 FS #4318

Hi My web site shows how i have completly replace the balsa o

Hi My web site shows how i have completly replace the balsa of an old FS. This might help welcome to www3.sympatico.ca/dompou Robert Montréal

Here, too, is a pretty good write up: http://edgewaters.

Here, too, is a pretty good write up: http://edgewaters.blogspot.com/2008/05/flying-scot-balsa-repair.html Seems doable.