Jib Sheeting

I am learning my way with the Scot. My used Scot has 1/2 inch sheeting for both main and jib. My wife and I both like its thickness...easy to handle, easy to grip without gloves, and we both have learned so far to like sailing without gloves. Questions: Does anyone see a big disadvantage to using 1/2 inch, especially so in light air? Or flip it around, is there a big advantage to using smaller diameter sheeting? Also, do most Scot racers use nylon or polyester lines? Nylon stretches more I know, and so I wonder if poly isn't better. Any thoughts... (And by the way, has anybody ever used gentry telltales on their Scot jib!! see other thread!) Frank

Comments

Frank, No one uses nylon.

Frank, No one uses nylon. Most people use either polypropylene or polyester (dacron). We've had good luck with 5/16 or 3/8 polypro over the last three seasons for jib, main and vang. The 2:1 jib sheet is our preference over the traditional 1:1. The 2:1 is easy to hold and adjust during a race. We run the sheet directly from the jib-block across the cockpit. There is a relief cleat next to the jib-track for the crew to use. It works for us. Other boats lead the sheet from the jib-block down to the seat to another block & cleat; then across to the crew. Your choice! The Un-Official Flying Scot webpage has several jib-control options you could consider: http://unofficial-flyingscot-page.home.att.net/ Jim Davis FS 784

Frank: I didn't realize you sailed at Nockamixon.

Frank: I didn't realize you sailed at Nockamixon. My boat came rigged with 1:1 sheets and I found that my crew had to cleat it off all the time to relieve their grip. I changed to 2:1 after a very windy regatta last fall. The sheet starts at the base of the block on the track, goes to a micro block, attached to a yoke on the jib clew that Flying Scot inc made for me, back through the jib fairlead block to the Harken ratchet cheek block and across the cockpit to the windward cleat. I ordered it all as one kit from FS part number 680300, and it was about $58.00 with the 1/4" sheets. The 2:1 makes the ratchets work more effectively and it is much easier to trim the sail in small increments which I think will make us faster. Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

Phil: What material do you use for the sheets? Do you have a

Phil: What material do you use for the sheets? Do you have anopinion re diameter for main/jib? Like to meet you this spring at the lake sometime...let's see if we can if you're game. Frank

I looked at the Flying Scot Inc site and they have the sizes.

I looked at the Flying Scot Inc site and they have the sizes. Main sheet - 3/8” X 60’ - light weight woven blue polypro w/inst. 210100 Jib sheet - 3/8” X 30’ - single braid - white (Regatta) 240100 ( I had these as my 1:1, and wasn't thrilled in heavy wind) Jib sheet - light - 5/16” X 30’ - Trophy braid - white 240110 The 1/4" white Trophy Braid is what I have on my 2:1 now and they are fine with the 2:1. I think the reason for the small size is so that the blocks on jib clew yoke can be the Harken Micro. Bigger line would need bigger blocks. Most yacht lines are polyester, I think. The mainsheet is polypro, mainly so it will float and not absorb water when it hangs off the boom into the water, or the free end falls in the water. Polypropylene is also very lightweight. Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club