FS diagrams

Are there any good diagrams of the Flying Scot online that shows all the parts on the boat, including the various rigging devices, etc? I have found diagrams (below) for the Wayfarer and Javelin but nothing for the Scot. Any help appreciated! Thanks in advance! This is good: http://www.abbottboats.com/images/wayfar4.jpg But this is better: http://www.odayjavelin.com/images/javspecs.gif

Comments

Join the FSSA and it comes with your membership binder.

Join the FSSA and it comes with your membership binder. Supporting the association should be your first move. Perhaps you should have bought a Wayfarer or Javelin.

quote:[i]Originally posted by FS5257[/i] [br]Join the FSSA and

quote:
[i]Originally posted by FS5257[/i] [br]Join the FSSA and it comes with your membership binder. Supporting the association should be your first move. Perhaps you should have bought a Wayfarer or Javelin.
Whoa! My reason for asking about a Scot diagram is so that I can learn more about the boat. I don't own a Scot--yet. And I will join the FSSA--if I buy one. With presumptious responses like yours, perhaps I should buy a Wayfarer or Javelin. Those guys have been quite helpful. Have a nice day, Henry!

I think you will enjoy the Flying Scot class it is very active,

I think you will enjoy the Flying Scot class it is very active, family oriented and most people seem to go out of there way to be helpful. Aside from the specs shown in the class rules you may find some helpful information by visiting these websites; http://www.scotsntexas.com/ http://www.flyingscotracing.com/ http://unofficial-flyingscot-page.home.att.net/ The last one above probably has the most info on rigging. Also check out this North Sails site; http://www.northsailsod.com/class/flyingscot/flyingscot_whatsnew.html#17 Hope this helps.

When I got my membership book, it had a diagram which I believe

When I got my membership book, it had a diagram which I believe is called the sail plan for the class. It is loaded with measurments, information etc. It needs to be printed on a min 11x17 just to be able to read all the stuff. I also ordered a book from FSSA with all the articles from their publication Scots n' Water that helped me loads. I believe there are also some instructional videos and in some areas, classes on sailing the Flying Scot. I am still trying to sort them out.

quote:[i]Originally posted by HarvardTiger[/i] With presumptiou

quote:
[i]Originally posted by HarvardTiger[/i] With presumptious responses like yours, perhaps I should buy a Wayfarer or Javelin. Those guys have been quite helpful. Have a nice day, Henry!
Flying Scot sailors are quite a helpful and nice. The association is quite active and provides a lot of great services which makes in part makes the Flying Scot better to other boats and their fleets. However, the association only survives through active memberships thus people here are encouraging others to become members. You'll only benefit from becoming a member. Maybe even becoming a Sustaining Member just during the time you evaluate the boat might be beneficial. Best of course is to find an Flying Scot owner or fleet to get to know the boat.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

Many, many thanks Dave812, Corsa and Claus.

Many, many thanks Dave812, Corsa and Claus. This is the kind of info I am looking for. And thanks for the info on "sustaining membership" in the FSSA; I'll look into that. The FS fleet closest to me has become a bit inactive; but, I have made contact with several of the owners and they all are quite outgoing in their willingness to help me evaluate the FS for my needs and desires (with a family, I'm buying for more than myself!). Again, thanks for the info! - Jim

I also considered the Wayfarer before buying the Scot.

I also considered the Wayfarer before buying the Scot. It's worth pointing out that although the Wayfarer is quite popular in the UK and other English-speaking countries, it's presence in the US is much more limited. The same holds for other Proctor designs like Wanderer and Gull Spirit, and for the Bucknell-Holt Mirror, whose hull count is now over 70,000(!). There is no Wayfarer builder in the US (none for the other boats either) and the class organization seems correspondingly much less active; compare the US Wanderer Assn schedule of events to that of FSSA. Owning a boat with a strong class association is more important than one might realize at first. It opens a lot of additional possibiltiies. -R. Larson (5573)

Havardtiger, Where are you located? Maybe there is a more activ

Havardtiger, Where are you located? Maybe there is a more active fleet that you are unaware of that is close by. John Cooke GNY District Governor

quote:[i]Originally posted by John Cooke[/i] [br]Havardtiger,

quote:
[i]Originally posted by John Cooke[/i] [br]Havardtiger, Where are you located? Maybe there is a more active fleet that you are unaware of that is close by. John Cooke GNY District Governor
John: I'm in Montgomery, Alabama. There are about a dozen Scots in a fleet on Lake Martin near my home. Two or three are sailed and/or raced on a regular basis. There is another Scot or two used for daysailing around the lake that have no affiliation with the fleet. But as I mentioned, the owners with whom I've spoken are quite helpful and enthusiastic. I think their racing activities have waned a bit in the past years. Thanks in advance for any advice you might have. And sorry to be so long replying; I've been in NY for a week at the US Open (tennis).

I sail a good deal on Thistle's, the greyhound cousin of the FS.

I sail a good deal on Thistle's, the greyhound cousin of the FS. The contrast between the two fleets in regard to the amount of information available on the internet is rather large. The Thistle class has the green book that you get if you join, but there is much more other information available online for the Thistle than for the Scot. Yes, the Scot is a great family boat and sailed by many fine people, but I often find it a puzzle that more information regarding the boat is not available online. John #1554

quote:[i]Originally posted by n/a[/i] [br]Are there any good di

quote:
[i]Originally posted by n/a[/i] [br]Are there any good diagrams of the Flying Scot online that shows all the parts on the boat, including the various rigging devices, etc?
Here you go: http://flyingscot.com/documents/OfficialPlanWhole.pdf "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemingway

And here in the Aug 2010 FS handbook page 53 and on.

And here in the Aug 2010 FS handbook page 53 and on. http://fssa.com/ht/fssa/fssa-handbook.htm

APSLTD.

APSLTD.com has about 2 dozen photographs of how they rig a Flying Scot. Depending on your level of interest and comitment to racing, not all of the hardware that is shown is needed for racing. Godd luck Boat no 3512

quote:[i]Originally posted by karafiath[/i] [br]APSLTD.

quote:
[i]Originally posted by karafiath[/i] [br]APSLTD.com has about 2 dozen photographs of how they rig a Flying Scot. Depending on your level of interest and comitment to racing, not all of the hardware that is shown is needed for racing. Godd luck Boat no 3512
It took me a while to find the link, but here it is (http://www.apsltd.com/c-2984-flying-scot-boat-photos-for-reference.aspx).

Looks like the factory issue "Radical race package" that came on

Looks like the factory issue "Radical race package" that came on my Scot except for the larger size headstay & the double hiking lines. Really like the cascading vang along the trunk, the Ronstan main sheet swivel, tapered aluminum pole, topping lift led aft to keep the crew from moving forward to adjust at just the point when you want the weight going aft instead. Recommend changing the wire centerboard pennant for 1:1 rope and removing the brass shroud rings, moving the anchor aft to the stern, leading the lift & chute halyard down thru the inside of the 2 spinnaker pole rings to eliminate snags on the inboard end of the pole, eliminating the forestay strap above deck by adjusting the under deck turnbuckle to the exact length for correct rake, using a single, continuous spinnaker sheet to make 2-up jibes easier for the skipper, marking with a Sharpie the default settings of lift, chute halyard (one foot down from max height) & jib sheets (don't forget the windward sheet setting too) and max vang mark to preserve the boom, using thin spectra chute sheets to eliminate guy stretch (gloves are mandatory), carrying a spare steel winch handle tied to the boat just in case, securing the mainsheet block on the rudder head from swiveling, altering the rudder blade angle to straight down vertical, eliminating all play in rudder/tiller/hiking stick system, tying the chute sheets to the sail with a close knot like the buntline hitch to get tack as close to pole as possible (no bowlines or Brummell hooks) We mostly use a 1:1 jib sheet for faster tacks except on very windy days. And in light air we go with a 2:1 main sheet secured at the rudder head, though this is risky if the breeze comes in. This is very nice downwind in a drifter.

Remember to secure the anchor aft to keep it from sliding around

Remember to secure the anchor aft to keep it from sliding around or migrating forward and getting underfoot. Secure the under deck forestay turnbuckle with seizing wire so it can't accidentally back off unnoticed. Eliminate all ring-dings with straight cotter pins, especially on standing rigging or tape the rings securely. Ring-dings have no business being used aloft at all. Get rid of all "dog leash clips" - spring loaded sliders. Replace with proper nautical fittings designed for the job. This is especially critical on the spinnaker halyard. If the clip snags the headstay above the jib, there is no way to lower the chute without also lowering the jib, creating a potentially dangerous situation with the spinnaker stuck up. We tie the halyard securely to the head - no swivel or fitting needed..

Since we are on the subject of diagrams.

Since we are on the subject of diagrams. Here is one for Harken blocks used on the Flying Scot. http://www.mauriprosailing.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_... I will add the caveat - Support Your Flying Scot Builder! [:D]

quote:[i]Originally posted by Andy Carrier[/i] [br]Since we are

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Andy Carrier[/i] [br]Since we are on the subject of diagrams. Here is one for Harken blocks used on the Flying Scot. http://www.mauriprosailing.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_... I will add the caveat - Support Your Flying Scot Builder! [:D]
Good diagram except that the cascading vang should be on the port side of the trunk due to the centerboard winch using up most of the tabernacle real estate on the starboard side. The winch isn't shown in the diagram.

Good catch Hot Wheels - the cascading vang should be on the port

Good catch Hot Wheels - the cascading vang should be on the port side.

With regard to the anchor and line, I keep mine in a laundry bas

With regard to the anchor and line, I keep mine in a laundry basket under the seat on the port side. The side rod for the danforth anchor projects throught the laundry basket mesh that is oriented toward the hull. Nothing pokes through towards the crew. Thus the anchor fits in the basket. In light wind sailing in a race you will want weight forward in order to minimize the transom immersion. The basket is kept under the seat by two very short elastic chords tied to the basket. There is a plastic snap at the free end that engages a plastic eye strap ( same type as on deck for the boat cover). The eyes are mounted at the very end of the seat lip and do NOT project into the cockpit because they angle downwards at a 45 degree angle.

When I got my most recent Scot the anchor was also stored in a s

When I got my most recent Scot the anchor was also stored in a similar spot on the Starboard side. I feel that this additional weight stored port or starboard affects your sailing. I store mine just forward of the spinnaker take up spool with one of the round bars (part of the fluke) stuck in a pad eye. The line has a quick release snap shackle that I keep in a bag also attached in the area. The anchor in this position has neutral weight, no benefit to port or starboard. It is out of the way of the spin pole and lines do not catch on it. When I raced J/24s everyone wanted to store weight (anchor, motor, gas can in the middle like this however class rules prohibited it and mode you store them in lockers port or starboard. Just my opinion. MrDave

Can someone tell me how to rig the lines that are supposed to go

Can someone tell me how to rig the lines that are supposed to go through three holes in the deck of my FS 790 at the base of the mast step (and yes I am a memeber and did buy the handbook but still cannot find it). My Customflex boat, bought used, did not have these lines installed and I have been combing the various pix, and info but still can't find out where they go from and to, and what they control. thanks in advance. Peter[?]

Peter

Have a Fantastic Day