Newby Questions

Hi, I have just bought and dragged home FS 173, and she'd a beauty. She's a bit tatty but seems solid enough. So can anyone tell me what year it was made, I'm thinking 1960 or 61? Its Douglas built. The tabernacle seems to be teak, should it be coated with something or just oiled. The original boom crutch socket is damaged and the stainless socket moved to the port seat, what does the boom crutch look like? Can I just make one? I will probably buy an outboard bracket and outboard so do I need to make some arrangement for installing the boom crutch on the starboard side? Can it just be free standing or does it have to be fixed into the deck. There is a plastic threaded socket on the starboard deck half way up the cockpit what is that? Oh another question, I intend to keep the boat on a mooring most of the time, what is the usual arrangement for moorings, last season I dropped an old engine block into the lake, attached a chain to it and a rope to that with a fender on the end as the buoy. How much longer should the line from anchor or buoy be than the depth? How heavy should a mooring anchor be? unfortunately I think I need my current mooring a bit further out, its too heavy to move easily though. Sorry for the dumb questions Thanks for any help

Comments

swabby: Your line from the motor block to the boat bow needs to

swabby: Your line from the motor block to the boat bow needs to be long enough to take into account rises in lake water level. We have seen boats go nose down as water level rises in our home lake by as much as 15 ft (Corps operations). If you are going to moore your boat, it most likely needs a water tight cover on it in the event of a hard rain. That is why you see most dingy sailer keep their boats on a trailer on land (called dry sailing) and at a steep enough angle so that rain water drains out the hole in the transom. Remember to put the drain plug back into this hole before launching the boat. jsd Lexington, KY

quote: If you are going to moore your boat, it most likely needs

quote:
If you are going to moore your boat, it most likely needs a water tight cover on it in the event of a hard rain. That is why you see most dingy sailer keep their boats on a trailer on land (called dry sailing) and at a steep enough angle so that rain water drains out the hole in the transom.
I'm not sure what you would define as "water tight", but you don't need anything but the tent boat covers that wraps around the front of the mast. This helps keep the boat into the wind and rain will not enter the boat, even in a hard rain. I have kept my boat on a mooring for years and have never had a problem with rain getting in the boat. [:)] An appropriate length pendant is important though.