Trailering--Boom Storage

I'm curious to know how other FS owners stow their boom when trailering. I use the standard wooden mast crutch at the mast step and the stainless crutch at the transom to secure the mast, but I haven't found a good way to secure the boom. For a while, I secured the boom under the deck along side the stantion forward, and the storage compartment aft, by wrapping bungies around the mast and boom. This worked to hold the mast down and kept the boom from banging around on the floor. Then I noticed that this caused the mast to bend slightly. Any one have any suggestions other than just laying the boom on the floor? B. Pfund FS 5139 Flying Fish <><

Comments

We basically leave the boom in the bilge BUT we tie two Tropican

We basically leave the boom in the bilge BUT we tie two Tropicana 1/2 gallon jugs with the bottoms cut off, around each boom end to prevent the gooseneck and outhaul end fittings from scratching anything and to protect the outhaul wire. With the vang and mainsheet attached, the boom isn't going anywhere and the protection spares the bow bag any holes should the boom slide forward. This way the boom is ready to rock at the regatta site without having to re-reave the mainsheet, etc. The OJ jugs make good bailers under sail. The rudder & head remains attached to the mainsheet as well and is protected by a rudder cover and sits in the bilge on the required USCG throw cushion.

My solution was to use 3.

My solution was to use 3.5" foam float noodles. I cut ten - 1foot long sections from a couple noodles, threaded 3/16" nylon rope through the the sides of the 5 sections at both ends. Then I could wrap one of these around the tack end of the boom and tie it snug with square knots. Ditto the clew end. Now I had both ends of the boom wrapped in a foam "tube". I slide the boom under the foredeck, then pull it partially back under the aft deck. Toss a couple vinyl bumpers in between the boom and trunk and you have a very well padded boom - no sliding, no bumping around, sitting 3.5 inches off the deck. Takes just a minute to tie and/or untie.[:)]

I have my Scot for less than a year and have wondered how well i

I have my Scot for less than a year and have wondered how well items stored in the boat while tailering will stay put. My method so far has been to put most of the line tails on the stbd. side of the trunk and lay the boom on top of them. I don't worry much about scratches, and since the paint on my floor wore off years ago there isn't much to scratch. In order to speed set up and take down I leave every item possible rigged for sailing; Spin and main sheets, vang, shrouds etc. Thanks to the recent hurricanes here in Florida I was able to perform a little test this past weekend. The boat had thousands of oak leaves and some small branches in the cockpit. I had about 20 miles to trailer and so we took off for the club. The leaves on deck blew away quickly but then it appeared the others were staying for the ride. We never exceeded 75 mph but still I was suprised that I did not see any indication of the leaves leaving in my rear view mirror. Sure enough upon arriving at the club and inspecting the boat I don't think any leaves blew out. We did notice on previous trips that the empty beer cans have no tendency to fly out of the boat either. So the bad thing is we had to clean out the leaves but the good thing is I will no longer be concerned about securing items in the boat. PS I bet there are some good tailering stories out there quite to the contrary.

The prior owner mounted a strategically notched 2x4 under the ca

The prior owner mounted a strategically notched 2x4 under the carpeted trailer support. The boom is lashed to this using two straps. The boom is then under the boat and nestled between the boat and the trailer wheel fender. It seems to be a very safe spot but a bit of a pain to put through and then attach the straps. For short rides to the lake I just throw it in the bilge on two cushions. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

I put the gooseneck of the boom right up against the wood mast c

I put the gooseneck of the boom right up against the wood mast crutch with the other end of the boom basically in the starboard corner of the boat under the deck. Leave the vang attached and just gently take the slack out of it and it holds the boom securely in place. Shawn

Giving credit to Bob New in Merritt Island, his method has been

Giving credit to Bob New in Merritt Island, his method has been adopted on my Scot. Simply insert the end of the boom (tackle and all) into the rear storage compartment and then lay the front of the boom into the centerboard drum cavity. Lines up perfectly and no damage.

quote:[i]Originally posted by FS5257[/i] [br]Giving credit to B

quote:
[i]Originally posted by FS5257[/i] [br]Giving credit to Bob New in Merritt Island, his method has been adopted on my Scot. Simply insert the end of the boom (tackle and all) into the rear storage compartment and then lay the front of the boom into the centerboard drum cavity. Lines up perfectly and no damage.
Sorry for sounding obtuse, but what do you mean by centerboard drum cavity? The space between it and the floor which would be on the starboard side? (Kind of where the photo is looking?) Also, when you say rear storage compartment, do you just mean the area under the rear deck (near the drain hole)? I am just envisioning that you put it on the starboard side of the centerboard trunk but something tells me that's not what you mean. Thanks http://www.flyingscotracing.com/cgi-bin/i/new_scot_images/flying_scot_ce... "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

The 'rear compartment' is the tupperware tray under the rear dec

The 'rear compartment' is the tupperware tray under the rear deck; by centerboard winch cavity, it is the actual drum area where the centerboard control line resides. The board will be up, so the drum area is 'empty'.

Actually, I have used several methods to tranport the boom.

Actually, I have used several methods to tranport the boom. The one I like best is to rest the forward end on top of the CB drum as it just fits there. The after end rests on the arm of the main sheet cleating assembly, swung out to stbd and padded by the coiled main sheet. You can get the boom forward enough to be able to walk around it when stepping/unstepping the mast. Putting the aft end in the under deck drawer (dishpan) tends to bend the drawer out of shape eventually. Bob New FS 5143 Merritt Island Florida Fleet Captain Fleet 179

Yes, my dishpan wouldn't support a boom (so I didn't try).

Yes, my dishpan wouldn't support a boom (so I didn't try). But that wooden jamb cleat on the stbd side of the tabernacle won't let me rest it in the cb drum. My FS is 30 years old - perhaps newer ones are different? "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

Here's what Harry C.

Here's what Harry C. the builder does with the boom when trailering new boats: The forward end [with the gooseneck turned sideways 90 degrees] goes in the deck slot behind the mast step [above the Tack-Tic mount] with the aft end jammed into the corner between the transom and bottom. It fits perfectly and does not rattle around. I put a sponge under the gooseneck, but he doesn't. Rotate the mainsheet cleat swivel to the opposite side away from the boom. It was stowed this way when I picked up my new Scot.