Sail opinions

I am looking to replace my sails this winter. What's everyone's opinion on which sail maker to use; North, Schurr, Quantum, Gus? What about loose vs snug vs tight rig; benefits of each? My assumption is that the boats come from the factory loose rigged; what differences/modifications are required to go snug or tight? Thanks in advance. Doug FS4491

Comments

Just had this discussion with Harry the builder recently.

Just had this discussion with Harry the builder recently. He has 2 Scots - both snug rig, one with Gus and the other with North. Both Bill Draheim [Gus] and Kelly Gough [North] are snug rig. They have won the last 2 NAs. The Norths seem to have a little more punch for chop and motorboat slop. And the Gus seem to be real fast in flat water lakes. The loose rig bounces around too much in slop downwind, and tightening the jib halyard to stop the wiggles is a hassle, only to have to loosen it at the leeward mark. From the factory you can adjust to any rig you wish. My new Scot will be snug. Graham Hall was the major sailor behind the tight rig. At some higher tension, the mast goes out of column, and the bow toggle bolt breaks. The snug is a good compromise as long as your jib's luff curve is cut for it. North now sells 3 different luff curves on a jib that is otherwise the same. Just received a mailing from North offering 20% discount, good until Oct. 8th. On my old Scot, in order to go tight rig, I had to drill holes in the upper shroud tangs above the original holes, to get enough tension. The new Scots come with these holes already in the tangs. The class rules do not allow drilling any more holes in the lower chainplate. As you know, the class legal lower shroud tangs must be used.

We like the Quantum (previously Sobstad).

We like the Quantum (previously Sobstad). The cut of the jib makes sense (a radial clew) and the price is very competitive. If you sail in heavy air (above 20) consider the excellent sails from Mark Beaton in Brick NJ. He has a jib and main that are durable, fast and proven in heavy wind. (We have his spinnaker and it is great) Any new sail is faster than an old sail. Bruce Cattanach #3817

does the comment "The class rules do not allow drilling any more

does the comment "The class rules do not allow drilling any more holes in the lower chainplate. As you know, the class legal lower shroud tangs must be used." meant that a tight rig cannot be used? I am novice and this sounded confusing.

This refers to the fact that the class does not allow you to low

This refers to the fact that the class does not allow you to lower the jib any closer to the deck, closing off any airflow between the deck and foot of the jib.
quote:
[i]Originally posted by frank barbehenn[/i] [br]does the comment "The class rules do not allow drilling any more holes in the lower chainplate. As you know, the class legal lower shroud tangs must be used." meant that a tight rig cannot be used? I am novice and this sounded confusing.
Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

quote:[i]Originally posted by frank barbehenn[/i] [br]does the

quote:
[i]Originally posted by frank barbehenn[/i] [br]does the comment "The class rules do not allow drilling any more holes in the lower chainplate. As you know, the class legal lower shroud tangs must be used." meant that a tight rig cannot be used? I am novice and this sounded confusing.
While it is not permitted to drill any additional holes in the port & starboard chainplates, it IS permitted to drill a new set of holes in the shroud tangs on the mast at the UPPER end of the shrouds, which allows additional adjustment options for tight and snug rig. All new Scots come with this second set of holes in the mast tangs.

A have question for Hot wheels regarding the holes in the port a

A have question for Hot wheels regarding the holes in the port a stbd. chainplates. I looked through the class rules and did not see anything related to the drilling of holes in the chainplates or that drilling the tangs above is allowed. Is this a new rule or did I miss it? Thanks.

I agree, I am having trouble finding this entry.

I agree, I am having trouble finding this entry. Some fairly straight forward rules for the standing rigging are found in ARTICLE S-III - SPARS, RIGGING AND FITTINGS Section 4, but it doesnt make it clear that drilling in the chainplates is illegal. I am not adovocating that it be done nor do I plan to do it, just supporting the point that for some of us who arent as familar with the rules, are not finding the part in the handbook that makes it illegal.

In a conversation about how "tight" is a tight rig, Harry said t

In a conversation about how "tight" is a tight rig, Harry said the factory will not repair chainplates that have pulled out of the hull or deck due to high tension, or replace a broken metal chainplate strap in the hull due to additional holes placed in them. The same result can be achieved by instead adding holes to the upper tangs, In the past, weak metal chainplate straps have been broken in collisions. So in my previous post above, please substitute the words "advised by the factory" for the word "permitted", as the published handbook does not address this issue, but the builder has.

I would advise that anyone thinking of drilling holes in the cha

I would advise that anyone thinking of drilling holes in the chainplate think twice before doing it all. If you still decide to go forward and drill those holes, You are undertaking a huge risk! Think about it, if you mess up the holes, you are screwed. It is far easier to replace the upper tangs than to send your boat for repairs! My advice, DON'T DRILL ANY HOLES IN THOSE CHAINPLATES! Mark FS 5516 Grey Hare