Rudder

[8)]How do you lock down the rudder blade on a F/S???????? I,am a new boat owner sail #2676The boat has a sys. to pull the rudder blade up but will it stay down while sailing. Thanks Chuck

Comments

If you have the builders rudder lift system installed, the blade

If you have the builders rudder lift system installed, the blade is held down by a shock cord led thru a cheek block and kept under fair tension to keep the blade down. If you do not have the lift system the blade, as in my old boat, there is a hole in the rudder head down towards the forward lower corner of the cheeks that will take a sacrificial wood or plastic dowel to hold down the blade and still allow it to swivel up in the event of contact with flotsam or the bottom. This prevents damage to the pintles and gudgeons. Here is the URL to the parts list which has the system on page 4: http://flyingscot.com/documents/04FSParts.pdf

quote:[i]Originally posted by Hot Wheels[/i] [br]If you have th

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Hot Wheels[/i] [br]If you have the builders rudder lift system installed, the blade is held down by a shock cord led thru a cheek block and kept under fair tension to keep the blade down. If you do not have the lift system the blade, as in my old boat, there is a hole in the rudder head down towards the forward lower corner of the cheeks that will take a sacrificial wood or plastic dowel to hold down the blade and still allow it to swivel up in the event of contact with flotsam or the bottom. This prevents damage to the pintles and gudgeons. Here is the URL to the parts list which has the system on page 4: http://flyingscot.com/documents/04FSParts.pdf

[:)]Thanks Hot Wheels------ I have neither one.

[:)]Thanks Hot Wheels------ I have neither one. The old owner has a lift system that works fine ,I need to find a way to pull it down when sailing. you don,t know how that shock cord works do you? I got to put a new center board gasket on and repaire the center board where it was down on the keel roller on the trailer. I need all the imfo. I can get about the F/s. I wish some one had a book about F/S.Thanks again Chuck

The builder Harry Carpenter has good instructions for installing

The builder Harry Carpenter has good instructions for installing the gasket when you purchase a replacement from him. I don't know how your rudder lift is designed, but the regular one has a line that pulls the blade up and cleats on the tiller. The shockcord holds the blade down, by being under tension and having sufficient length to allow the blade to be raised. This length is obtained by running the shock cord from the blade thru cheek blocks mounted on each side of the lower forward corner of the rudder head and dead-ending up the head aways on both sides. Maybe someone has a photo or diagram to post here?

quote:[i]Originally posted by Hot Wheels[/i] [br]the [Flying Sc

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Hot Wheels[/i] [br]the [Flying Scot Inc.] one has a line that pulls the blade up and cleats on the tiller. The shockcord holds the blade down, by being under tension and having sufficient length to allow the blade to be raised. This length is obtained by running the shock cord from the blade thru cheek blocks mounted on each side of the lower forward corner of the rudder head and dead-ending up the head aways on both sides. Maybe someone has a photo or diagram to post here?
The on-line Flying Scot Inc. store has a photo which will illustrate what HotWheels says. Click on this url and go to the Accessories section where you will find the rudder lift. https://wx17.registeredsite.com/user1002163/store/ I have used this lift system very happily on two boats. The blade is held down very well by the shock cord tension. I often come into a beach to pick up people. Easily lifting the blade prevents bending it sideways in shallow water. For racing, the system helps you clear any weeds (or unavoidably encountered buoy lines). For getting underway from a mooring, I keep both the centerboard and rudder up to prevent fouling on the dinghy painter which lies nicely along the hull. Once I know I'm clear of the dinghy painter, centerboard and rudder go down. And a just-newly-learned-trick: for sculling in no wind conditions, the blade may be lowered just a bit. I'm a big fan, in case you didn't notice. FSSA Forum editor