sans Winch crank

I sailed to lunch last week and dropped my winch crank into the deep as I lowered the sail. I went to my bag where I keep extras and saw the only one left had been snapped (the work of my nephew). After lunch I returned to my boat and was able to make the snapped winch work well enough to get the sail up. It had just enough bite left on it to work. What does one do if there is no wench crank available at all?

Comments

I've seen a regular ratcheting socket wrench being used.

I've seen a regular ratcheting socket wrench being used. I believe the 3/8" shaft of the wrench is the same size as the square shaft on the wench crank. Just be careful... you can get the halyard much tighter (maybe dangerously so?) by using the wrench. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ FS5074

Always carry several cranks on board.

Always carry several cranks on board. They have invisable legs and can jump long distances.[:)] A flapping jib sheet is nortorius for sending them out of the boat. Never lay a crank on the foredeck. That's when those legs take over. The 3/8" drive of the socket is the correct size. I find that a short extension bar helps to save the knuckles. It's great for snugging up the rig too. Bill Ross, FS/5210, President FSSA

Bill Ross  F/S 6020

Chairman FSSA National Championship Committee

I have a very thin cable, about 18" long with loops on each end.

I have a very thin cable, about 18" long with loops on each end. I once used it to lock my helmet to my motorcycle. Using the stainless steel crank handle, I loop one end around the handle and another through a small cleat at the base of the mast. The crank handle has done it's best to leap over the side for the last two seasons but so far to no avail.

tommy, i suggest you check out http://home.

tommy, i suggest you check out http://home.att.net/~unofficial-flyingscot-page/misc.html i put a foam key fob on each of the three cranks that are on-board...the cranks float and three fobs are cheaper than a replacement crank richard

The aluminum versions have a "built-in" failsafe, as such they w

The aluminum versions have a "built-in" failsafe, as such they will break off if too much force is applied, which is detrimental to the halyard/mast-head/rig. Buy a handful, get the floaters (see above) and sail relaxed. Your rig should raise easily, and it helps to mark the halyard wire to to the prescribed 'headboard to top of mast' distance. Stop there, and have fun! As a backup, a 3/8 ratchet and extension about 3" long in the ditty bag is always smart....

Seems my crank handles are always breaking.

Seems my crank handles are always breaking. I tried spraying some WD 40 in the track and on the pulley. it seemed to work better, but the next time I went out, same old thing. I think I am getting drag from corrosion in the sail track. FS 1385

Flying Scot sells a lubricant called SuperLube for the winches,

Flying Scot sells a lubricant called SuperLube for the winches, which made mine stop making aweful screaching noises. If you have corrosion in the sail track, I cleaned mine by using the edge of one of those dark green scotchbrite pads. It didn't scratch the mast but made it nice and shiny in the sail track, with a little dish soap. I had dirt in mine from the boat sitting. You may also be able to use SuperLube on the sheave at the mast head, if you are having a tough time raising the main. Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

It only gets stiff when the mast is vertical and raising the sai

It only gets stiff when the mast is vertical and raising the sail. if it is horizontal with the sail, it works fine. The floats on the crank handles works great. I keep my spares with the floats installed. FS 1385

I have used a product called "FastTrac" sail track lubricant wit

I have used a product called "FastTrac" sail track lubricant with success. It comes with a little piece of cloth with a boltrope. You attach that to the main halyard on one end and attach a downhaul to the other. You grease it up and then run it up and down the sail track. It works well and, for me, did not gum up the sails or track at all. Made it far easier to crank up the main. Byron bj

Of course make sure that the wind doesn't blow into the sail whe

Of course make sure that the wind doesn't blow into the sail when you raise it. Should be obvious, but sometimes the obvious things are missed.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

That was how I snapped my first crank.

That was how I snapped my first crank. The top batten got on the wrong side of the shroud. FS 1385