Spinnaker flying - what about the jib?

It seems like I remember hearing something from when we took our sailing lessons about keeping the jib filled when flying the spinnaker. However, I never seem to be able to make the jib be of much help when the spinnaker is up. Sometimes I can hold it to the side so maybe it gets some wind, but usually it just hangs there. Is it worth even trying to use the jib, or should I just ignore it? Maybe the extra effort would be best spent on fine tuning the spinnaker. I looked through Cal's pictures from midwinters and from what I can tell, it seems like people weren't worrying about the jib. Any tips? Melissa ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ FS5074

Comments

The Scot jib only draws well on more of a reach.

The Scot jib only draws well on more of a reach. While running with the chute, the jib does not draw at all and in lighter air should probably be lowered so it does not block the chute, assuming the boat is tight rigged. If loose rigged, the jib can be left up and the jib halyard tightened to stabilize the rig in motorboat slop during a light air run. Scots don't tight reach well with the chute. Gains can be made by concentrating on proper jib trim and not setting the chute on a real tight reach - sailing high over the boats ahead that are struggling to fill a chute.

Thanks! This may sound silly, but I've never heard the term "

Thanks! This may sound silly, but I've never heard the term "tight reach". Does that mean "almost a run"? Now that you mention it, I seem to remember reading an article by Sandy Gordon in an old Scots n' Water. He also recommended not sailing on a run, that it's faster when you don't. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ FS5074

A tight reach is a beam reach.

A tight reach is a beam reach...90 degrees to the wind.

quote:[i]Originally posted by Melissa[/i] [br]Thanks! This m

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Melissa[/i] [br]Thanks! This may sound silly, but I've never heard the term "tight reach". Does that mean "almost a run"? Now that you mention it, I seem to remember reading an article by Sandy Gordon in an old Scots n' Water. He also recommended not sailing on a run, that it's faster when you don't. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ FS5074
Right! The tight reach is when you can barely carry the kite. A run is when you are going dead down wind, or nearly so. I think what you may be referring to is using the tiller going dead down? Good to minimize anytime, but you can shift weight to steer and reduce drag. Otherwise, not sure what "not sailing" would mean on any point of the race course.

So if we're flying the kite and the jib is up, where do we cleat

So if we're flying the kite and the jib is up, where do we cleat? I have an older Scot - 1978. I have one set of cleats either side. Do I need to install a 2nd set? Any rigging diagrams to indicate this? "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

How does nowhere sound? The jib can be handheld by the clew if

How does nowhere sound? The jib can be handheld by the clew if you have three or cleated on the leeward side (the side opposite the side the pole is on) if you only have two in the boat. The spinnaker sheet is almost never cleated, as trimming it actively is much faster. You could cleat the guy side (the side with the pole) with the cleat on that side of the boat that the jib is not cleated in. Most boats that race do have cleats separate cleats for the jib and spinnaker. Phil Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

quote:[i]Originally posted by sawyerspadre[/i] [br]How does now

quote:
[i]Originally posted by sawyerspadre[/i] [br]How does nowhere sound? The jib can be handheld by the clew if you have three or cleated on the leeward side (the side opposite the side the pole is on) if you only have two in the boat. The spinnaker sheet is almost never cleated, as trimming it actively is much faster. You could cleat the guy side (the side with the pole) with the cleat on that side of the boat that the jib is not cleated in. Most boats that race do have cleats separate cleats for the jib and spinnaker. Phil Phil Scheetz FS 4086
Thanks Phil - makes perfect sense and after I posted I realized when we race the J27s we don't (and almost never) cleat our spinnaker lines. Also, I just stumbled upon instructions for a through-hull rigging on the FS website which does have a pair of cam cleats. Interesting although not something I'll be setting up. If anyone's interested: http://www.flyingscot.com/documents/instructions/Internal%20Spinnaker%20... "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway