Cruising the Scot ( sleep onboard )

I have heard of four ways of sleeping onboard. One is the way discribed by Barry on the 1st cuising topic ( sleeping on the floor with boards to flatten the surface). There is one discribed in "Highlights of Scot's and Water", a book available from FSSA. This method suggests a headboard and foot board resting across the seats. Three aluminum poles connect the head and foot ( one on each side and one in the middle) with a fabric cot suspended on them. This makes a double bed. I've heard of using a set of boards between the seats to form a complete floor at seat level and putting sleeping bag etc. on that. And finally, a variation on the above. Build a flat platform on the seats and then pitch a small tent on the platform and sleep in the tent. All of these, except the tent version, assume a mooring tent to keep out the weather. How have people attached their bug netting to make the standard mooring tent useable? Has anyone used the full mooring cover as a sleeping cover? The full cover has the end closed in with netting already, can be attached with drawstring around the gunnels ( sealing the sides from bugs ), and would provide for some night time storage room on the fore deck.

Comments

The mooring cover I've used attaches to the gunnels with aluminu

The mooring cover I've used attaches to the gunnels with aluminum hooks on bungee cords and fastens around the front of the mast. The back of the cover is open but offers a suprising amount of protection from the weather because it extends to the transom. Bug netting attaches across the back of the cover with Velcro. Bug netting loosely stuffed along the gunnel under the cover secures that area from the bulk of the bloodthirsty hordes. Before bedtime, use bug spray around the cover as a little more defense. I motorcycle camped for years and, in addition to a tent, had a "jungle hammock" to pitch when I wanted to nap or ride late and start early. It had a waterproof top and sides of bug netting and went up between two trees in five minutes. When planning your sleeping arrangements you may want to consider ease of set-up for napping or lazing in an environment often plagued by flies and skeeters. The platform I'll try this year will consist of 1/4 inch plywood and 1x4's on edge. The platform will rest on the seats and centerboard trunk and divide in half for stowage under the seats.

We just purchased FS 1210 from FS;factory reconditioned.

We just purchased FS 1210 from FS;factory reconditioned. We've read in SCA about two guys that slept on the floor with their feet aft and heads just beyond the centerboard trunk. We won't pick our boat us until later this month, so we don't have any hands-on experience. I've also read where two boards are fitted between the seats and centerboard trunk; the boards can be stored under the seats when not needed? We intend to camp/cruise on our FS, so sleeping aboard is important to us. We'll post our findings when we have time to investigate this subject first hand...John